Doctor Who: The Crusade

This Doctor Who story was first broadcast in four episodes in 1965. Episodes 2 and 4 are missing from the BBC archives.

This audio version was first released in 2005. It consists of a digitally remastered soundtrack (probably sourced from an off air recording) with linking narration provided by Williams Russell.

The TARDIS arrives in 12th century Palestine where a holy war is in progress between the forces of King Richard the Lionheart and the Saracen ruler Saladin. Barbara is abducted in a Saracen ambush and the Doctor, Ian and Vicki make their way to King Richard’s palace in the city of Jaffa.

The script was written by David Whitaker who wrote several stories for the series and also served as Doctor Who‘s first Script Editor.

The guest cast includes Julian Glover and Jean Marsh who went on to have illustrious careers in film and on television.

Jean Marsh would appear in The Daleks’ Masterplan as Sara Kingdom, a role she has reprised in several Big Finish productions. She also co-created Upstairs, Downstairs for ITV and The House of Elliot for the BBC; appearing as Rose in the former.

The audio can be downloaded from here

http://mobile.audible.co.uk/productDetail.htm?asin=B008NCU5WK&s=s

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Doctor Who: The Romans

This Doctor Who story was first broadcast in four episodes in 1965.

This audio version was first released in 2008. It consists of a digitally remastered soundtrack (probably sourced from an off air recording) with linking narration provided by Williams Russell.

The serial was the second written by Dennis Spooner who contributed several scripts to the series including co-writing, with Terry Nation, the epic The Daleks’ Master Plan. He also served as script editor from The Rescue to The Chase.

Despite his work on Doctor Who, Spooner is probably best known for his contributions to ITV series such as Thunderbirds, The Avengers, Department S and The Champions.

The four time travellers are enjoying a rare holiday, staying at a villa not far from Rome in the year A.D. 64. The Doctor soon becomes restless and sets off to visit the city, taking Vicki with him. In their absence, Ian and Barbara are kidnapped by slave traders.

This story has adventure and comedy in almost equal measure. The main thrust of the comedy comes from the Doctor being mistaken for a lyre player who has been engaged to perform for Nero. The Doctor has to go to extraordinary lengths to avoid admitting to Nero that he cannot actually play the lyre.

This is very enjoyable story if you don’t mind a slightly lighter story from the Hartnell era.

This audio can be downloaded from here

http://mobile.audible.co.uk/productDetail.htm?asin=B004F406YW&s=s

Doctor Who: The Reign of Terror

This Doctor Who story was first broadcast in six episodes in 1964. Episodes 4 and 5 are missing from the BBC archives,

This audio version was first released in 2005. It consists of a digitally remastered soundtrack (probably sourced from an off air recording) with linking narration provided by Carole Ann Ford.

The serial was written by Dennis Spooner who contributed several scripts to the series including co-writing, with Terry Nation, the epic The Daleks’ Master Plan. He also served as script editor from The Rescue to The Chase.

Despite his work on Doctor Who, Spooner is probably best known for his contributions to ITV series such as Thunderbirds, The Avengers, Department S and The Champions.

The TARDIS materialises not far from Paris in 1794 — one of the bloodiest years following the French Revolution of 1789. The travellers become involved with an escape chain rescuing prisoners from the guillotine and get caught up in the machinations of an English undercover spy, James Stirling — alias Lemaitre, governor of the Conciergerie prison.

This is an enjoyable historical adventure with good performances throughout especially from William Hartnell when the Doctor is impersonating a Regional Officer of the Provinces.

The audio can be downloaded here

http://mobile.audible.co.uk/productDetail.htm?asin=B007PQOV3O&s=s

although Audible to seem to have confused this version with the Target novelisation.